Practical Ecommerce

24 Winners from the 2016 Facebook Awards

Facebook has announced the winners of this year’s Facebook Awards, celebrating the best marketing campaigns on the Facebook platforms. For any business interested in marketing on the social network, the Facebook Awards are an opportunity to see what works.

Here is a list of the 24 winners of the 2016 Facebook Awards. The winning campaigns are in five different categories: Small Business (new this year), Innovation, Beyond Facebook/Integrated, Best Use Of Facebook Platforms, and Facebook For Good. The awards are Gold, Silver, and Bronze, and a single Blue Award for the top prize.

2016 Global Awards: Blue Award

Beats by Dre. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) Universal Pictures partnered with Beats by Dre to promote Straight Outta Compton, the biopic movie of the headphone company’s founding father and billionaire rap mogul, Dr. Dre. The campaign began with over 100 influencers across music, sport, and pop culture, describing where they are #StraightOutta and how that shapes their story. The campaign also created an app for people to make their own custom memes to rep their own hometowns.

Beats by Dre.

Beats by Dre.

2016 Global Awards: Gold Awards

Ariel – Share The Load. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) Laundry detergent Ariel decided to stand up for women’s equality at home with #ShareTheLoad. The Indian campaign began with a Facebook video that asked the question “Is Laundry Only A Woman’s Job?” and encouraged people to have a conversation with #ShareTheLoad. Later a Wash Bucket Challenge was launched with men uploading selfies while doing laundry.

Give Me a Heart. (Category: Facebook For Good) To encourage more people to register as donors, Donate Life America used Instagram’s heart icon as a simple way to sign up. The campaign features portraits of actual people who are on the heart transplant waiting list. Promoted posts directly took users to registerme.org, where signing up took less than one minute.

Silent Ads. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Like all brands that post on Facebook, Hotels.com has to deal with the reality that ads auto-play silently. To break through the “wall of silence,” Hotels.com ran a campaign designed for the Facebook silent auto-player. Directed by Captain Obvious, the Hotels.com spokesman, the “silent ads” invited followers to engage, and then rewarded them when they did. The result was a campaign with more than five million views in the first three weeks and thousands of shares and comments. The Silent Facebook Ads generated consumer engagement of five times the average for Hotels.com.

Silent Ads.

Silent Ads.

Sonic Drive-In #SquareShakes. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Sonic Drive-Ins teamed up with famous Instagram chef @ChefJacquesLaMerde to create Sonic Drive-In #SquareShakes. Everything from the glass each shake was served in, to the ingredients, to the cherry on top was perfectly square for Instagram’s square format. The shakes were ordered through Instagram too. At the Coachella music festival, geo-fenced Instagram ads let people order #SquareShakes through the new “Shop Now” button.

The Boys. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Australian underwear brand Bonds wanted to get Australian males 18 to 39 thinking and talking with their mates about their choice of underwear, in an effort to re-establish Bonds as the “comfy undies.” Slightly risqué videos were created and released three every two weeks. With a limited media budget, Bonds used Facebook for the opportunity to be precise in reaching the target demographic. Bonds used Facebook’s retargeting features to ensure a consistent arc and minimal repetition.

The Kidsbook Collection. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) If everybody is on Facebook, why don’t we have books there too? That’s how Kidsbook Collection project was born. Itaú, one of the largest banks in Latin America, used Facebook Canvas to create pocket books for parents’ timelines. To catch parents’ attention, kids books were written by renowned authors that usually write for adults. Ads were targeted to deliver the books to parents with young children around bedtime.

The Kidsbook Collection.

The Kidsbook Collection.

The Subaru Make a Dog’s Day Initiative. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) Subaru worked with Facebook to launch The Make A Dog’s Day Initiative, a campaign designed to inspire dog owners everywhere to invent new and innovative ways to make their dog’s day, and to then share their videos. The campaign was launched with a 2-minute film on Facebook, featuring a man taking his elderly dog on a cross-country “bucket list” trip in his Subaru. The success of #MakeADogsDay increased awareness for the ultimate way to make a dog’s day, the dayi t get a new home.

This Unicorn Changed the Way I Poop. (Category: Small Business) In This Unicorn Changed The Way I Pooped, Squatty Potty enlisted The Prince of Poop and his counterpart, a magical unicorn, to help sell its toilet stool. Because everyone poops, the goal was to produce something that appealed to everyone. The video needed to both entertain and educate potential customers on why they absolutely need to use a Squatty Potty to poop better. To take advantage of Facebook’s autoplay, the first shot was conceived as a rainbow poop swirling out of the unicorn’s butt, hooking people as they scroll through their feed.

Unsuitable Journey. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) To prove its suits can withstand any journey, M.J. Bale conducted the ultimate road test: putting a suited subject through a five-day torture test of travel. Throughout, Instagram showed the steadfast quality of the suit. Facebook albums showed the decline of the man. To prove that this torturous journey was real, it was broadcast live to Facebook — M.J. Bale was one of the first Australian brands to utilize Facebook Live. In the first two weeks, M.J. Bale had a 20 percent increase across the suiting range online and across its 38 stores.

Unsuitable Journey.

Unsuitable Journey.

2016 Global Awards: Silver Awards

Bufferface. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Verizon crafted Bufferface from the insight that everyone knows the frustration when your network doesn’t work, especially when video chatting or texting. The campaign was a series of funny fails, capturing the exact worst moment in which either could get stuck. Instagram showcased the campaign in two ways: a marquee creative mimicking poor video experience from a first-person point of view, and carousel creative allowing followers to swipe through screenshots of conversations that have been interrupted by poor service.

Don’t Like and Drive. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Four in 10 drivers use social media while driving. It is twice as dangerous as drunk driving, and the phenomenon keeps growing. To be in the right place at the right time, Ford came up with the “Don’t Like and Drive” posts. An Instagram campaign was launched to remind drivers of the dangers of using social media behind the wheel.

Dreams of Dalí. (Category: Innovation) For the Dalí Museum, Dreams of Dalí is an interactive experience that takes viewers inside Salvador Dalí’s mind. It is a virtual-reality experience at the museum in which viewers can move freely and as a five-minute 360-degree interactive video in which they are guided by a camera track. During the development of Dreams of Dalí, Facebook announced the rollout of 360-degree-video in news feeds, which led to creating the digital component of the experience as it exists today. The video has received over 1.4 million views from Facebook alone.

Dreams of Dali.

Dreams of Dali.

F21 Thread Screen. (Category: Innovation) On July 22, Forever 21 and BREAKFAST unveiled the F21 Thread Screen, a 2,000-pound machine that uses 6,400 mechanical spools of thread to display Instagrams that are hashtagged with #F21ThreadScreen. It streamed live online 24 hours a day from July 22 to 28. Users received an auto-edited video of their Instagrams being displayed on the screen. The F21 Thread Screen celebrated Forever 21’s back-to-school Tried and True campaign. See a recap at f21threadscreen.com.

Justino. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) In Spain, every lottery number is divided into tenths, so people are used to buying tickets with the same number. If they win, they all win together. Based on this, a campaign was created for El Gordo, the Christmas National Lottery. The campaign and animated short film centered around Justino, a worker at a mannequin factory. The factory had a Facebook page where people could follow the working day; Justino had an Instagram page for his nights at the factory.

Justino.

Justino.

KAFA (enough) Violence and Exploitation. (Category: Facebook For Good) In Lebanon, more than 13 percent of girls get married before they’re 18. Women’s Rights NGO Kafa asked Leo Burnett Beirut to rally public support against child marriage. For the campaign, the setting was the most famous public space in the capital: the Cornish, where newlyweds take pictures with a breathtaking view. But the film’s newlyweds were different: The bride was a little girl. Facebook allowed users to share content directly from KAFA’s page and react on it, tagging their friends and generating the essential conversation.

Smirnoff Instagram Your Fridge. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) Smirnoff’s target audience of 18 to 25 year olds are becoming increasingly resistant to traditional advertising from global brands trying to identify with them and their lifestyles. The solution was an Instagram-based campaign getting people to send in shots of their fridge. Smirnoff’s online bartenders responded with suggestions for great cocktails, based on what they could see in the pictures. Each person received a personalized Instagram video showing how to make the cocktail.

The Tough Sell. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) The Tough Sell was a campaign of six video shorts following a city car salesman and a Volkswagen Golf, as he set up the world’s most remote car dealership in the Australian outback. The innovative features of the Golf are impressive anywhere, but somewhat out of place in the outback: amazing cornering abilities for the endlessly straight roads, the rain-sensing wipers for the arid landscape, and traffic features in a town with no traffic.

The Tough Sell.

The Tough Sell.

2016 Global Awards: Bronze Awards

Give Mom Back Her Name. (Category: Facebook For Good) There is a peculiar taboo in Egypt where men never disclose their mother’s names in public, fearing they could be shamed or ridiculed as subject of jokes. So much so that mother’s names are forgotten over time, and they are only referred to as “the mother of her eldest son.” Before Mother’s Day in Egypt, the “Give Mom Back Her Name” was launched. The film was seeded online, where it would subsequently be picked up, leveraged, and spread across every corner of the nation by Egypt’s mass media and by Egyptian citizens on Facebook.

Handheld Rescue. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) To raise donations and remind New Zealanders about the importance of rescue helicopters, the Westpac Chopper Appeal fundraiser used Facebook tools to place a life into the hands of the user. It filmed a woman trapped in a lifelike emergency, based on real-life rescue stories, and then cut the film into a series of episodes with her situation getting worse. The films were posted to the audience’s newsfeed, using a combination of sequencing and reach and frequency posts. If the user did act, she would see a film of the woman being rescued by the Westpac Chopper.

I Am A Witness. (Category: Facebook For Good) The I Am A Witness campaign helped millions of young people combat bullying online. The goal was to transform them from passive bystanders into a united, empowered, and active collective that will speak up against cyber-bullying with a simple tool: an emoji. The Ad Council brought together the main digital platforms to broadcast the message: Apple, Google, Snapchat, Twitter, Reddit, Kik, Whisper, and some of the biggest social influencers. In conjunction with Facebook’s measurement team, the Ad Council built out a 3-month sequenced funnel approach across Facebook and Instagram to track awareness, intent, and action.

I Am A Witness.

I Am A Witness.

Rainbows. (Category: Beyond Facebook / Integrated) On September 16, 2015, Doritos Rainbows took over the brand’s social pages, coming out in support of the L.G.B.T. community. Promoted video posts drove fans to DoritosRainbows.com, the only place where they could buy their own bag of Doritos Rainbows. After selecting their donation amount, fans were asked to submit and post a quote of support, driving them back to Facebook or Twitter, where the conversation continued. With the purchase of every bag came a new, positive post on Facebook or Twitter. Doritos Rainbows posts attracted a record-breaking number of comments, likes ,and shares for the brand, making Facebook a hub for the primary goal of the campaign: conversation.

Saudi Women’s Online March. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) To empower Saudi women with confidence to achieve, a notion that’s at the core of the brand purpose, “Empower women to live to their fullest potential.” Always, a market leader in menstrual pads, launched the first online march. Women joined the march by sharing footage of their steps moving for a better tomorrow. This gave them a platform to express themselves and voice their aspirations using the hashtag #MoveForward (and its Arabic equivalent).

The movement launched on Facebook and Instagram with three influencer videos sharing their personal success stories and encouraging girls to participate. This was followed by reference videos by Instagramers explaining how others could participate.

The Laziest Competition Ever. (Category: Best Use of Facebook Platforms) To promote a new beer, Lazy Yak, a campaign was launched around The Laziest Competition Ever, called Win Beer: Do Whatever You Want to Enter. Most brands (and social promotions) ask a lot from people who enter their competitions on Facebook. But Facebook is not necessarily about complexity or constraints. It’s about people expressing themselves however they like. So the competition let people do exactly that: do whatever they wanted to try and win a bit of beer. With just $500 AUD paid media, and ten cases of beer worth $49.50 AUD each, the contest received 1,200 entries and reached over 123,000 Australians, a big result for next to no effort.

The Laziest Competition Ever.

The Laziest Competition Ever.

Sig Ueland

Sig Ueland

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