Practical Ecommerce

6 Product Page Factors that Drive Sales

Among the most underrated aspect of ecommerce websites are product pages. When consumers consider actual items to purchase, it’s the product pages that determine if they want to buy from your website, or not. Product pages, in my view, are where the sales are really made.

6 Product Page Factors to Drive Sales

1. Price. Studies show that most online shoppers decide to purchase a product online based on the price. Consumers frequently shop for the best price. Always try to stay in line with your competitors’ prices.

If you have better prices than they do, show it to consumers. One way to do this is by building your own price comparison box. This very element on your product page can prove to be extremely valuable to your consumers and really help with conversion rates.

2. Product authenticity. If you’re a merchant that sells established brands, you know that product authenticity has been a concern since the beginning of ecommerce. This is mostly due to counterfeit goods sold through eBay and throughout the web. Your product page should have a seal of authenticity — i.e., a graphic — that assures consumers the product they are looking at is authentic. While some of the major sites like Zappos don’t have this issue, mostly because they sell at full manufacturer suggested retail prices, many small-to-medium size retailers may lose sales due to shoppers’ concerns about product authenticity.

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ShadesDaddy.com, a retailer of eyewear, emphasizes being an authorized Ray-Ban dealer. This helps with authenticity.

ShadesDaddy.com, a retailer of eyewear, emphasizes being an authorized Ray-Ban dealer. This helps with authenticity.

3. Reviews on product page. While many consumers know what they want and are looking at it on your website, they may still search on Google for product reviews. They will look for reviews not only about your website but also for reviews about the product itself. This has contributed to the success of review websites. Even Google decided to display reviews in pay-per-click ads.

Instead of having consumers exit your website to read reviews, have the reviews on the product page itself. Services like Power Reviews can provide the platform for this. However, most shopping cart platforms offer a built-in reviews feature.

Amazon has great success because, in part, the amount of content on any product page is enough for consumers to make a decision about a purchase. Even if consumers decide not to purchase that product, they will always go back to Amazon because they know the amount of content there will always suffice to make a purchase decision. They trust Amazon because of the helpful descriptions of most of the products, and also because of the many consumer reviews on each product.

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Amazon provides many helpful reviews for each product, reducing the need for shoppers to search elsewhere for them.

Amazon provides many helpful reviews for each product, reducing the need for shoppers to search elsewhere for them.

4. Coupon code on product. Many consumers search on Google for coupon codes for your website. Sites like RetailMeNot.com are thriving due to consumers seeking out coupons. Coupons help close the sale. While the consumer is on your website looking at a product, he or she might leave to search for coupon codes. Try, instead, to keep the consumer on your site.

If you have coupons to offer, make sure they are visible on your product pages. More than text, a simple graphic will do the job.

5. Product availability. Displaying a product’s availability on a product page is underrated. When consumers consider a product, the first questions they often ask are, “Is it available? Is it in stock?” If you don’t make this clear, you may delay the sale or lose it altogether.

If you have the product in stock, let shoppers know. Moreover, as a conversion tip, try to create a sense of urgency with consumers if that product is hot or running low. If you have a platform that allows you to show the quantity of stock, display that fact. The fewer the quantity, the more urgency it will create.

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To create a sense of urgency, ShadesDaddy.com informs shoppers when a product is running low on stock.

To create a sense of urgency, ShadesDaddy.com informs shoppers when a product is running low on stock.

6. “Add to Cart” and “Buy Now” buttons. Another underrated element on product pages is the “Add to Cart” button. Different wording will have different results and a different reaction to consumers. For example, the buttons can say either “Buy Now” or “Purchase Now.” Conduct tests to determine which is best. Track conversion rates as you change and test different variations of the word and colors used.

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Pablo Palatnik
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Comments ( 5 )

  1. Jennifer Hurshell May 1, 2012 Reply

    I agree with your assessment, and would like to elaborate on one point that is somewhat buried under # 3, reviews on product page.

    You state that, "Amazon has great success because, in part, the amount of content on any product page is enough for consumers to make a decision about a purchase. Even if consumers decide not to purchase that product, they will always go back to Amazon because they know the amount of content there will always suffice to make a purchase decision" etc..

    The key nugget here is the amount of information Amazon provides shoppers, especially on it’s "A+" pages. What Amazon understands and has proven with extensive A/B testing–and other IR 500 retailers are starting to recognize–is that the purpose of the online product page is to provide a HIGHLY INFORMATIVE shopping experience.

    Here are the product page elements we recommend to all of our retailers clients: a product description overview summarizing the SKU, that goes well beyond a couple of bullet points; as well as several ‘product feature + customer benefit’ paragraphs elaborating on that description; all of the copy should be written absent industry jargon or techno babble so that’s it’s accessible to the average consumer; moreover additional images are helpful, especially if they show the product in use; and finally a "What’s in the Box" section is critical to managing shopper expectations. 360 degree spin imagery and product videos complete what we consider to be the best practice for product pages.

    Unfortunately the lack of a more comprehensive product description can mitigate all of the benefits of your points 1 – 6, as shoppers may not stay on the page long enough, due to the lack of information required to be able to make an informed purchase decision wether online, in-store, or on a mobile device.

  2. Dora Jenner May 1, 2012 Reply

    I disagree with your number 4 point. Adding a coupon code directly on your website or product page will likely cannibalize your revenue because you have customers who would order the product(s) anyways and you provide them an unnecessary coupon code discount. Coupon sites like retailemenot.com or http://www.promocodepal.com offer value to retailers by bringing new customers to them that they otherwise would not have had. Of course the retailer is losing some revenue to those customers that type in the retailers name into Google along with the words ‘Coupon Code’ or ‘Promo Code’, but the number of people doing that is still relatively small. Just ask my partner who still pays full price no matter how many times I’ve said to look on Google for coupon codes before buying anything online.

    My favorite sites for coupon codes in addition to Retailmenot.com are:

    1) http://www.bensbargains.net
    2) http://www.promocodepal.com
    3) http://www.couponsavings.com

  3. Philippe Lang May 2, 2012 Reply

    The article mentions exposing competitor’s price on product page if your prices are better than the competitors.

    Our experience at Winbuyer.com has shown that you don’t need to be priced lowered than your competitors in order to beneficiate from showing competitors prices on your site. Shoppers want to see that they are getting a fair price. If you give them that confidence through pricing transparency on your product pages, they don’t need to leave your site to go comparison shopping and that translates into double digit lift in conversion to sales.

    Price comparisons, product reviews, product details and product availability: it’s all about providing more transparency to the online shopping experience. If you don’t give it to your shoppers, they will look for it somewhere else.

  4. Vincent Sgro June 6, 2012 Reply

    I agree with Jennifer, I think you are overlooking a rather large factor commonly taken for granted–product content. An excerpt (listed below) from your 3rd bullet point seems to directly reference the notion of product level content.

    "Amazon has great success because, in part, the amount of content on any product page is enough for consumers to make a decision about a purchase. Even if consumers decide not to purchase that product, they will always go back to Amazon because they know the amount of content there will always suffice to make a purchase decision."

    Product level content on a page, similar to reviews, is an attention grabber for buyers/shoppers. When you go on a page, you see–and here’s that trending word again–CONTENT. Product content, depending on how much was included and to was degree, is what educates, informs and keeps the attention of the consumer.

    If a consumer is on the fence about a product, uncertain about its features, what it offers, how it works, then having the necessary content to answer these questions is a BIG selling point that ultimately leads to higher online conversion rates and lower return rates at e-tailers (since the consumer usually has a better idea what they’re buying, BEFORE they buy it).

  5. Mike September 28, 2013 Reply

    I think there are some great points in this article, however I am disappointed to not see nor hear a mention of video. Video has been a fantastic driver of online conversions over the past few years (and is only getting stronger). Not only are videos super informative and engaging but they provide customers will the right amount of information to win them over. Just look at a number of our clients at Treepodia, http://www.treepodia.co.uk/En/Home/Resources/Case-Studies.html a number of them have seen increases in conversions rates which surpass 88%. If that doesn’t prove the benefit of video on product pages, I don’t know what else does :)

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